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Sales Leadership
How to Keep Your Customers Coming Back
Apr 7, 2016 | The Canadian Professional Sales Association lock
We all have a favourite customer: the one who studies every offering and demonstrates their loyalty with repeat purchases. Often, they start off by trying one product and become so enamored that they end up buying even more complementary items than they had originally intended.
 
These loyal members of your tribe act differently than those who are on the periphery. There is much less effort and upselling involved with customers who repeatedly buy from you than there is with casual customers who make infrequent purchases.
 
Keeping that in mind, what if you were able to convert more of your casual customers into faithful fans? The benefits would be extensive. First of all, there would be far less pressure on acquiring new customers. Your existing customer base would also drive more continuous revenue. Here are some ways to instill trust in your customers such that they will dependably turn to your company whenever they need a solution.
 
Add Value by Proposing Upgrades

Your customer has purchased an introductory item that meets a specific need at a relatively low cost. Rather than having them walk out the door for good, why not provide further value by suggesting an ancillary product or service? If they bought a piece of technology, for example, then upgraded hardware or peripherals can really augment the utility of their original purchase. You can present case studies of how users have taken advantage of their purchase to do this. Moreover, be sure to demonstrate the contrast between their current setup and a more desirable, advanced implementation. This will help them realize the advantages of increasing their spend.
 
It is easy to get carried away with recommendations, though. Always make certain that the upgrade path you suggest actually makes sense for the customer’s needs. Similarly, the options you present should create repeatable sales opportunities. As the customer begins to realize the added benefits you’re offering, you can propose more lasting and exclusive options such as subscription packages and membership reward programs. For example, by guaranteeing membership discounts you can simultaneously enhance the client’s experience while collecting their business on a more continual basis.
 
Show off Your Product Line
 
Amazon is masterful at cross-selling. They gather a great deal of information about your buying preferences and habits, and then at strategic moments they present similar options or accompanying products that would complement your previous purchases.
 
Your organization may not collect similar depths of analytics data, but utilizing information about your customers’ profiles and providing appropriate cross-selling pitches at the appropriate times can open up new product options that the customer had not considered previously. For instance, if a person bought a new gaming system from your store then comfortable entertainment chairs could be presented as part of a follow-up process within a few days.
 
One way to determine which of your products are complementary to another is to look at your product portfolio and see what customers tend to buy together. If you notice a conclusive trend, integrate those products into a timely and systematic pitch for the buyers who would benefit most.
 
Provide Robust Services
 
If it is beneficial for a product to be supported over time with additional services, sell high value-added services to augment the product. When executed properly, this can become a recurring revenue model (monthly or annually), depending on the sophistication of a product.
 
B2B software vendors like to add support, training and/or consulting services to their software sales to help their users enjoy the most benefits from their tools. Some organizations, including Apple, provide free training classes to their customers. These lessons serve two purposes: 1) they keep the customers coming back into the store, and 2) they allow the sales reps to upsell brand new items.
 
Whether you use your service options as direct revenue or indirect incentives to foster relationships, you can always build new opportunities into each sale. Your sales and marketing efforts will consequently become more streamlined as your repeat customers grow increasingly familiar with your offering each time they return.
 
Get Creative
 
The only thing limiting your opportunities to gain repeat sales is your own creativity. Examine your current casual customer base. What do they typically buy? What problems are they trying to solve? Once you have some answers, formulate some sensible and valuable ways to employ the aforementioned strategies.
 
Ultimately, your customers will benefit from having you as a one-stop shop for meeting their needs. As they grow to understand your business, they will be much less likely to explore your competitors in the future – especially if they are also receiving membership benefits or rewards incentives on top of enjoying your great services.
 
About the Canadian Professional Sales Association
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Contact us today at MemberServices@cpsa.com or 1-888-267-2772 to see how we can help you and your team reach new heights in sales success.
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