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Sales Strategy
How to Negotiate with Different Personality Types
Nov 20, 2017 | Canadian Professional Sales Association lock

As a sales pro, it’s important to continue to hone your negotiation skills throughout your career. Importantly, you must be flexible and can’t stick to a one-size-fits-all approach. If you’ve been in sales for a while, you’ll know that different people negotiate and behave differently during the negotiation part of the sales cycle.  Some people tend to negotiate at a rapid speed and are all for taking risks, where others like to take their time and play it safe.

While there are a number of factors that go into negotiation styles, a fair amount of this is down to people’s personality types. Here we’ll explain how to negotiate with different personality types for sales success.

The Driver

A person who falls under the Driver personality type is someone who is assertive, decisive and determined. They probably come across as quite unemotional and as someone who likes to be in control. Drivers like efficiency and can become quickly impatient.

How to Negotiate with a Driver

Don’t waste their time; Drivers like negotiations to move quickly and will expect you as a sales pro to be polished and prepared. Come ready with answers that go into specifics and speak to results and impact.  A Driver won’t be swayed by emotional appeals so facts and logical arguments are important and always remain professional and to the point. It’s important to come across as assertive without being aggressive. Drivers will lose respect for those they perceive as passive or weak but don’t like their authority to be challenged.  Finally, don’t bother with small talk or personal guarantees, stick to the task at hand and focus on facts and stats.

The Expressive

People with this personality type are confident, enthusiastic and often spontaneous. Unlike the Driver, the Expressive loves people and puts great value into relationships.  They’re likely to be creative and emotional - someone who is prone to taking risks.

How to Negotiate with an Expressive

 Since Expressives are relationship people, it’s important to build rapport through small talk and anecdotes - these guys enjoying talking, especially about themselves. An Expressive’s decision to buy is often an emotional one so ask them lots of questions and solicit their opinions; you need to make them feel connected to you and your product. During the negotiation process, it’s important to keep an Expressive on track, so keep summarizing what’s been said and re-emphasize points of agreement. Since they are impulsive, keep an eye on their reactions, the moment you spot the impulse to buy, go for it. You may be able to seal the deal then and there. Don’t wait too long or the opportunity will fly by.

The Amiable

The Amiable personality type is someone who is agreeable and likable but not particularly assertive or goal orientated. They’re friendly and easy to get along with but these types of people shy away from risk.

How to Negotiate with an Amiable

 Due to their passive nature, you might be tempted to think that an Amiable will be a pushover in negotiations. But going for the hard sell is always a mistake. While they might not say “No.” then and there as they dislike conflict, if you come across as too aggressive, they’ll just never take your call again. Instead, take the time to build trust and a good personal relationship. A consultative approach works well; help them feel part of the sales process by asking questions and offering low-risk propositions. If you gain their trust, your personal assurances and testimonials will go a long way. People with this personality type are loyal; if you win them over, they’ll most certainly be a long term customer. 

The Analytical

The Analytical personality type is just that: precise, logical and driven by facts and data. They come across as shy, serious and usually skeptical.

A critical thinker, the Analytical likes to study things in depth and will not be pushed to make a quick decision. In fact, when it comes to negotiating, the best thing you can do is present a meticulous, specific and logical case in writing rather than try to persuade them in conversation. Stick to the facts and give them space and time. These types of people are cynical by nature and the stereotypical “sales” persona is a turn-off. Make a fair, honest and risk-free proposal for negotiation success.

Want more tips on how to negotiate effectively? Master the negotiation process and close more deals at higher profit margins with CPSA training.

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